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Welcome to the Veterans UK website - Free Veterans Helpline 0800 169 22 77

Frequently Asked Questions

Medals
Service records
Welfare
Veterans Free Helpline

Medals
Please read the information on the Medals page before writing to any of the medal offices.

Q.
Can I still claim my Second World War medals?
 
A.
Medals from the Second World War can still be claimed by writing to the relevant medal office listed on the medal page.
 
Q.
I am the widow/widower or legal next of kin of a World War II veteran; can I claim the medals.
 
A.
The medals can be claimed however the MoD will ask for proof of death and kinship before the medals are issued to you. Please write to the relevant medal office listed on the medal page.
 
Q.
I need to know which medals I/my spouse/my relative (legal next of kin) was issued.
 
A.
Please write to the relevant medal office listed on the medal page.
 
Q.
I have lost my medals, will the MoD replace them?
 
A.
The MoD policy is that it does not replace lost medals, however if they have been stolen or accidentally destroyed (for example in a house fire) and proof can be forwarded, then the MoD may replace the medals. Otherwise it is recommended that you contact a reputable medal dealer (see your local yellow pages) to obtain replacements. If you have had your medals stolen or accidentally destroyed and can provide the necessary proof, please write to the relevant medal office listed on the medal page.
 
Q.
In what order should my medals be mounted?
 
A.
Please write to the relevant medal office listed on the medal page.
 
Q.
I want to know about commemorative medals (medals not issued by Her Majesty's Government) and where I am supposed to wear them.
 
A.
Please contact the Veterans Free Helpline
 
Q.
Am I entitled to a medal for National Service?
 
A.

There is no official British Medal for those who were called up for National Service. It has never been the Governments policy to award a medal purely for being a member of the Armed Forces.e range of medals instituted at the end of World War II including the 1939/45 Star, 1939/45 War Medal, the Defence Medal and the Campaign Stars for the various campaigns in which they took part.

Those called up between 1946 and 1960 were eligible for the various clasps to the General Service Medal for the operations in which they may have served in Malaya, Cyprus, Kenya etc and those who served in Korea were eligible for a campaign medal.

In the case of the estimated two million people who were conscripted into the Armed Forces in the post war years, those who did take part in campaigns or operations for which medals were awarded, had an equal right to receive them as did their Regular colleagues. Conversely those who spent their National Service in the UK or with the British Army of the Rhine in peacetime conditions, did so alongside their Regular colleagues who likewise did not receive a medal.

It would be divisive to offer National Servicemen a medal simply for being conscripted, when those who volunteered for service would be excluded from receiving an award. Even today there are many people leaving the Armed Forces without having received a campaign medal during their service. This does not imply that their contribution to the defence of the country has not been appreciated.

 

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